Possessions That Really Matter

“If your house was burning, what would you take with you? It’s a conflict between what’s practical, valuable and sentimental. What you would take reflects your interests, background and priorities. Think of it as an interview condensed into one question.” ~ Foster Huntington
 
It is amazing how much a single picture of one’s most prized material possessions can reveal about a person. The things that a person value is a very insightful window into their priorities and values. Foster Huntington created The Burning House to invite people to answer this question with a picture. The Burning House asks the question in a metaphoric sense to get people thinking about the role material possessions have in our lives. As the reality is that no material possession is worth risking one’s life for in a fire. In the moment such a question would almost seem too overwhelming on the spot when one is mentally in the flight survival mode. In which case the universal first thoughts are people and pets as nothing else matters. If that is not an issue, then a person may grab their bag, laptop, phone or wallet, but only if it is next to them on the way out.
 
With that in mind consider this similar question: Imagine you live in a small village in a tiny one or two room hut. In the middle of the night, you wake up to an anti-Christian mob going through the village. They are going from house to house and hacking all the Christians to death with machetes. You realize that your only chance to survive is to immediately flee into the night toward the forest. Praying that you can avoid detection long enough to hide and not be found. Assuming that you are dressed and that you do not own any weapons, what if anything would you grab before running out of the house?
 
I wish the above situation was purely hypothetical for the sake of an argument but it is not. It comes from an article about modern persecution of Christians I read years ago. A Christian woman in a third world nation really did wake up in the middle of the night to an anti-Christian mob going through her village and hacking to death all the known Christians with machetes. Without any hesitation, she grabbed her Bible and hymnal and ran off into the night. The situation leading up to her split second evacuation is clearly nothing to glorify. Although I feel what it flushed out about her values was a very beautiful thing. The woman’s actions demonstrated that she knew the true value of the material things in her house in terms of her relationship with God. Strictly speaking there is nothing remarkable about a Bible and a hymnal in how they are both physical books made out of paper. Bibles and hymnals are only significant when they are used as tools.
 
In this case it demonstrated the woman’s value in being able to read God’s Word and worship God with hymns. So she valued these two books as the most important items in her house to grab on her way out. I realize that some critics will try to downplay this given her context. Sure Bible are a lot more rare in areas of persecution where they are illegal to own. So how much do you value your Bible? Or I should say Bibles given that you likely have several physical Bibles and eBibles on your computer and or phone. If you are like most American Christians you likely own more copies of the Bible than the times you have read through the entire Bible. Can you honestly say that your most treasured material possessions are a Bible and a hymnal or prayer book?

Sweeter Than Chocolate Book Review

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“Do you enjoy God’s Word more than television? More than the Internet? More than your phone? If you find yourself turning off the television, unplugging from the Internet, or ignoring your phone to study the Bible, you have developed a healthy addiction. That’s a true expression of how much you value God’s Word.” ~ Christy Bower
Sweeter Than Chocolate is a basic book that has two main goals. First to inspire you to truly enjoy the Bible by approaching it with the right mindset. Second to provide a basic overview of the different ways of taking in the Bible and various study aids that may be helpful. The book is inspired by the image in Psalm 119 which describes the Word of God as tasting sweeter than honey. Christy points out that in the modern world chocolate has become to us what honey was in the ancient world. Today when one craves something sweet to enjoy, it is chocolate, not honey that we seek out. Thus to put Psalm 119 in a modern context, the Bible should be enjoyable or something is wrong. More times than not the problem is not approaching the Bible in a way that leads to understanding. The book then goes to provide an overview of the various methods to get more out of the Bible. This includes various approaches to reading and reflecting upon the Bible in a way that is meaningful to who you. Christy also provides an overview of the numerous types of Bible study resources that can help increase one’s understanding and enjoyment of the Bible.
What I like most about Sweeter Than Chocolate is Christy’s very positive writing style. Her book is completely free of any fear and guilt manipulation to make people feel bad if they do not read the Bible. Instead, Christy offers gentle encouragement and helpful suggestions to take into consideration with an overall emphasis on how reading the Bible should be enjoyable. She even goes to the point of urging the reader not to read the Bible when they do not feel like it. The logic behind this suggestion is that forcing oneself to read the Bible only reinforces the negative view that it is a chore. As compared to enjoying the Bible which will naturally lead to us wanting to spend more time in Bible reading. I see Sweeter Than Chocolate as being the especially helpful to teenagers, young adults and people who are new to the Christian faith. Although any Christian can be inspired by her message of how the Bible should be enjoyable in the same way that eating chocolate is enjoyable.
Disclaimer: I was given a free copy of this book by Christy Bower in exchange for agreeing to write an honest review. I have not been paid or pressured to write a positive review by Christy. The content of this review is completely my own opinion. This post contains affiliate links to help cover the cost of running the site.

The Paper 100 Things Challenge

The 100 Things Challenge has both clear virtues and clear pitfalls. The main virtue of the 100 Things Challenge is that it forces one to reflect upon what is important. Given that it is only after one is in touch with what they value that one is able to think about what is most worth keeping. Once one knows what is most worth keeping, it is a much easier to figure out what to discard. Another advantage is that the challenge sets limits that force one to remain mindful. The other virtue of the 100 Things Challenge is that it sets limits. The limits force one to evaluate everything that is coming into and out of their life. The 100 Thing Challenge inventory main advantage is forcing one to remain mindful of the role of material things in their life.
 
The main pitfall of the 100 Things Challenge is that it tends to be wasteful of money and resources. Given that the 100 Things Challenge focuses upon getting rid of things for the sake of doing so. I agree with getting rid of things that one does no reasonably see oneself using again. And all the more so if one can sell it or pass it on to somebody that can make use of it. But what about the extra things that one will reasonable need in the future? Let us consider clothing that still fits and looks good on you? The fact that one has too much good clothing is merely a side effect of the rate of new clothing coming in at a rate faster than one’s existing clothing is wearing out. Good stewardship and common sense would say that a better solution is to stop buying new clothing until there is a real need and then only buy what one needs to make it through a typical wash cycle. Thus, decluttering should ideally be accomplished through everyday wear and tear.
 
It is with this concept of more responsible decluttering in mind that I suggest one approach the 100 Things Challenge in the style of paper trading. Paper trading is normally used within the context of a person simulating stock market trading without putting any money at risk. The Paper 100 Things Challenge is a middle of the road alternative that is ideal for people who are attracted to the idea of the 100 Things Challenge but feel it is too extreme to actually do for real. Keep in mind that 100 is just an arbitrary number which could just as easily be 150 which is Dunbar’s number. I feel that 150 would be a better starting point as it is both more practical and meaningful. As I think it is a given that everybody has a personal relationship with their material possessions even if they do not want to admit it.
 
The Paper 100 Things Challenge is easy to complete. Simply take a piece of paper and number it from 1 to 100 (or 150) and list out the things that are the most important to you that would make the cut if you were to actually take the 100 Things Challenge. If the space on the list seems a bit short for you, make one of your items a wardrobe sublist of 100/150 articles of clothing. Also keep in mind that you do not have to own everything on the list as this is more of an ideal list of minimalist personal possessions. Once you are finished with your Paper 100 Things Challenge list you are now armed with a valuable tool. The most important part of the Paper 100 Things Challenge is taking the time to create your list of items which takes you through the heart of the 100 Things Challenge. At its core, the 100 Things Challenge is an exercise in mindfulness of one’s personal possessions. Therefore simply doing the work of preparing a list of what is most important to you will make it easier to let go of items that were not valuable enough to make the list. The list can also help prevent impulse buys on unimportant things that are not in line with your values. Finally, if you go through the work of creating a Paper 100 Things Challenge list, I would recommend taking the time to review and possibly update.
 
I realize some people may think this is too much of a cop-out when it comes to the 100 Things Challenge or desires to take it to the next level. To take it up a notch, try packing away or at least boxing up anything that does not make the list to see if you can live with it on a daily basis. That way you can both reap the benefits of the experience of a radically simplified life and not have to worry about getting rid of things that you will later need to replace. In time through normal wear and tear you might find yourself living a real 100 Things Challenge lifestyle. Or you might realize that in reality a 150 to 333+ things lifestyle better fits your needs and values. The truth about minimalism is that living with less can help streamline your life to free up more time and energy for what matters. Above all remain mindful of what you really need as minimalism is about living with the right amount for your lifestyle. Finally, if you do not see the point or feel that the Paper 100 Things Challenge takes up too much time, then please disregard my suggestion.

A Critique of the 100 Things Challenge

When we talk of the 100 Things Challenge it is important to keep in mind that the main reason David Bruno created it was to regain control of his life. In his case, the 100 Things Challenge was a year-long exercise in mindfulness to reset his priorities and regain control of his life. The 100 Things Challenge was never intended to be a one size fits all requirement to being a minimalist. Many minimalists pride themselves in being nonconformists to the materialistic culture around us. Simple living and its minimalist subset, are growing counter-cultures within our materialistic society. Thus simply because it has become the in thing to do among minimalists, is the worse reason for doing it.
 
One of the main issues that I have with the 100 Things Challenge is that in some circles it has turned into a challenge of who can own the least amount of stuff. In the style of reverse materialism, it has been revised into a 75 Things Challenge and a 50 Things Challenge. For a time there was even one guy that claimed to own only 15 things. These attempts seem to make the 100 things the maximum number of personal possessions one can own and still be a real minimalist. One step further are the single bag minimalists who literally limit themselves to what can fit into a single carry-on sized bag. Please note I am not saying that people who live this way are arrogant elitists who think they are better for owning less stuff. It is the wider culture of radical minimalism as reverse materialism to the extreme that concerns me.
 
The areas of overhead and responsible stewardship of resources are two areas that I see the 100 Things Challenge having major issues. The purpose of minimalism is to get rid of unnecessary overhead caused by having more than is needed. The 100 Things Challenge, on the other hand, adds the overhead of keeping an active numbered inventory of one’s things. The 100 Things Challenge is also potentially wasteful as it involves getting rid of “extra” things for the sake of a number as compared to one’s needs. For example, one may own 3 pairs of regularly used shoes and eliminate 2 pairs for the sake of the challenge. The problem is that when the remaining pair wears out one will need to replace it. So one ends up buying a new pair of shoes shortly after discarding 2 perfectly good pairs of shoes. These two reasons alone are in my opinion enough to be uneasy about taking part in the 100 Things Challenge.
 
Finally, I wonder how much of the attractiveness of the 100 Things Challenge is rooted in materialism. Materialism temps us into seeing material objects as a way to fix problems and provide meaning and purpose. In the same way, radical minimalism also tempts us with the image of a dream escape from the struggles and complexity of modern life. So if one goes after the 100 Things Challenge like a person orders the next miracle kitchen gadget after seeing it on TV. In which case I can promise you that the 100 Things Challenge will fail to life up to that level of hype. This is because our search for lasting fulfillment, meaning and purpose are spiritual matters.

The 100 Things Challenge

The first time that I encountered the concept of minimalism was a blog of a computer programmer that had recently become a Buddhist. His new faith had influenced his view of material possessions and thus sparked a major decluttering spree. He was writing about the 100 Things Challenge, which he considered too arbitrary and lacked consistency. For example, he did not think it made sense that certain things like books and collections were excluded. Overall the post had sparked my interest on the topic. I was amazed that somebody would make an effort to reduce their personal belongings to 100 things or less.
The 100 Things Challenge or technically the 100 Thing Challenge as it was originally called was started by a Christian man named Dave Bruno. Dave felt that he was becoming overwhelmed both mentally and spiritually by the stuff in his life and felt the need to do something about it. His solution was the 100 Thing Challenge as a year long fast from American-style consumerism. There are a few variations of the 100 Things Challenge but most share these common principles. First is that a collection of items only counts as a single item. For example, one’s coin collection or personal library of books only counts as a single item the challenge. Second is that many people set up a memorabilia box which is either excluded or counted as a single item. This serves as a buffer to allow one extra time to process sentimental items. As family heirlooms, and other treasures should not be  discarded in haste. Third is that one is free to make and change rules as they go along to a certain extent. This is because the purpose of 100 Things Challenge is not about counting items. As it is best viewed as an exercise in mindfulness of one’s personal material possessions.
Searching online for more articles about the 100 things challenge I came across my first batches of minimalist blogs. I was amazed at the brave bloggers who actually listed everything that they owned on the internet. Some took it even photographed everything that they owned and put it up on the internet for the world to see. Which got me thinking what it must be like to declutter to the point of being able to easily list and photograph everything that one owns. The practice of listing one’s possessions is not as strange as it sounds. Insurance experts say that everybody should have a documented home inventory for insurance purposes. Which raises a good point that if something is worth owning than it should be worth documenting in one’s home inventory. So if such an important task comes off as insanely overwhelming to you, could it be due to owning too much stuff?

Bible Apps and Pocket Bibles

“Listen to Jesus, and every day the word of Jesus enters our heart and makes us stronger in the faith. I suggest taking a little copy of the Gospels, a little one, to carry in your pocket, in your bag, and when you have a bit of time, when you are sitting here or there, and you can read, pick up the Gospel and read a few words. The Gospel is always with us!” ~ Pope Francis

Years ago there was a little email parable going around that compared Bibles to cell phones (before smartphones). In short, it challenged the reader to treat their Bible more like their cell phone. In the sense that most people carry their cell phone with them at all times and will return to retrieve it upon realizing they left it behind. Without a doubt, this was a very creative and well-meaning illustration to make us think about how much we value the Bible in our lives. Although it neglected the obvious differences between Bibles and cell phones. Cell phones unlike books, are designed to be portable and easily fit into our pockets and purses. As compared to Bibles which tend to be a bit too large to carry around like a cell phone.

A more helpful question for today would not be if you treat your Bible like your cell phone but are there any Bible (and possibly prayer) apps on your phone. Smartphone Bible apps are best suited for quick reference and short readings. As phones are too small to be well suited for longer devotional readings. So for practical purposes, Bible apps are the little pocket Bibles of our modern age. I am referring to the pocket Bibles the size of a man’s wallet. They generally contain the New Testament and maybe Psalms and Proverbs in tiny print. The pocket Bible of the previous generations did not replace full-sized Bibles at home. So while a Bible app on a phone is not the best primary Bible, it allows one to read the Bible in the little bits of time during the day. Chances are that all of us that have Bible apps on their phone, also have games and social media apps on our phones, myself included. Let me be clear there is nothing wrong with games and social media in moderation. What matters is that we should seek to become more aware of the activities that we tend to default to during pockets of unexpected free time throughout the day. This is because the things that we naturally drift toward reveal what we focus upon most which reflect and influences our values. It is just like how companies know that the more they expose you to images of their products in advertisements, the more likely you are to buy it. This is why the Bible tells us to take care and be aware of our thoughts and the ideas that we are taking in. It is not any different from a person that wants to get in shape and lose weight. If they are serious about their goal they will immerse themselves to fitness and nutrition articles and videos. This helps increase their chances of success by reshaping their values and lifestyle to be in line with their goal. In the same way, the Bible instructs us to expose ourselves to God’s thoughts and ideas, in order to be transformed into the people that God is calling us to become. Thus the more we focus on the things that God values, the more God’s values will become our own and shape how we live out our daily lives.

Minimalism and Mysticism

“Whenever material things, money, worldliness, become the center of our lives, they take hold of us, they possess us; we lose our very identity as human beings.” ~ Pope Francis

“Over against this whole array of materialistic infidelity, now, we owe it to ourselves to make sure at least of our own personal hold on the realness of things unseen and eternal; so that the spiritual world shall not be for us a shadowy utopia simply, but a positive substantiality, coming close home to our daily interest and thought. Such habit of mind cannot be in us with the facility of mere natural growth. It requires heavenly planting, and much inward attention and culture. It would carry us too far to go here into the details of this culture. Meditation, prayer, the right use of God’s disciplinary providence, intimate converse with the Word of God, where the powers of the spiritual world are always at hand as indwelling ‘spirit and life’.” ~ John Williamson Nevin, The Spiritual World, 1876

When it comes to a blog with a primary focus on deeper spiritual living, the topic of minimalism may catch some by surprise. Minimalism is normally thought of in terms of material possessions and responsibilities. Minimalism is not about being lazy and only putting in the minimal effort needed to get by. The purpose of minimalism is to seek to reduce the amount of things that ultimately do not matter in order to be able to better focus one’s time and resources upon what matters most. Therefore minimalism is to some extent an essential part of mysticism. Sure I realize that many people turn to minimalism as a way to get rid of the mountain of unneeded stuff that is weighing them down. The truth of the matter is that simply getting rid of stuff for the sake of being free is not a long-term solution. Likewise, a hoarder that simply gets more stuff for the sake of feeling secure is also not a long-term solution. Minimalism is a tool, and like any tool, it is important to understand not only what it can do but also what it can not do. As let’s face it regardless of how high quality of a hammer that one has, a hammer is useless when it comes to fixing a clogged toilet. As a tool minimalism can be useful to help one regain and maintain control over runaway amounts of material possessions. Although minimalism alone cannot change anything deeper than the surface. The materialist can focus on how much stuff that they have just like the minimalist can focus on how little stuff they have. The frugal minimalist can focus on how little money they spend on stuff. And the only the best minimalism can focus upon the quality of the few things that they own. Although in the end all of the above are still slaves to their stuff. Given that obsession over their stuff demonstrates that their material possessions possess them. The real problem is not with minimalism. The real problem is that the deeper problems are ultimately spiritual in nature. Many of us have even been duped into thinking that we can treat the spiritual with material things and activities. Meaningful living requires having a spiritual purpose and meaningful life goals. Thus a radical minimalist living out of a single bag can be equally spiritually malnourished as a hoarder that has most of the rooms in their house filled wall to wall, floor to ceiling with stuff. Given that a healthy level of detachment from physical objects, it can be impossible to make progress on one’s spiritual journey. You do not have to go to the extreme of getting rid of everything and forsake personal ownership of any material object through a vow of poverty. Just realize that spiritual and even life development can be hindered until one is able to put physical objects in their proper place. Material possessions are tools that help you accomplish things and not a source of meaning and purpose in your life.