The 100 Things Challenge

The first time that I encountered the concept of minimalism was a blog of a computer programmer that had recently become a Buddhist. His new faith had influenced his view of material possessions and thus sparked a major decluttering spree. He was writing about the 100 Things Challenge, which he considered too arbitrary and lacked consistency. For example, he did not think it made sense that certain things like books and collections were excluded. Overall the post had sparked my interest on the topic. I was amazed that somebody would make an effort to reduce their personal belongings to 100 things or less.
The 100 Things Challenge or technically the 100 Thing Challenge as it was originally called was started by a Christian man named Dave Bruno. Dave felt that he was becoming overwhelmed both mentally and spiritually by the stuff in his life and felt the need to do something about it. His solution was the 100 Thing Challenge as a year long fast from American-style consumerism. There are a few variations of the 100 Things Challenge but most share these common principles. First is that a collection of items only counts as a single item. For example, one’s coin collection or personal library of books only counts as a single item the challenge. Second is that many people set up a memorabilia box which is either excluded or counted as a single item. This serves as a buffer to allow one extra time to process sentimental items. As family heirlooms, and other treasures should not be  discarded in haste. Third is that one is free to make and change rules as they go along to a certain extent. This is because the purpose of 100 Things Challenge is not about counting items. As it is best viewed as an exercise in mindfulness of one’s personal material possessions.
Searching online for more articles about the 100 things challenge I came across my first batches of minimalist blogs. I was amazed at the brave bloggers who actually listed everything that they owned on the internet. Some took it even photographed everything that they owned and put it up on the internet for the world to see. Which got me thinking what it must be like to declutter to the point of being able to easily list and photograph everything that one owns. The practice of listing one’s possessions is not as strange as it sounds. Insurance experts say that everybody should have a documented home inventory for insurance purposes. Which raises a good point that if something is worth owning than it should be worth documenting in one’s home inventory. So if such an important task comes off as insanely overwhelming to you, could it be due to owning too much stuff?

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